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>>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." the two leading candidates fighting to be u.s. president hardly have time to sleep or eat as they dart from state to state trying to solidify their support. the latest poll ahead of tuesday's vote suggests barack obama and his republican challenger mitt romney are almost tied. obama has 49% support. romney has 48%. the candidates dashed through key swing states over the weekend, including new hampshire. they are making their final arguments to voters. both campaigns are trying to lock in crucial electoral college votes. >> you know that i know what real change looks like, because i fought for it alongside you. i've got the scars to prove it. i've got the gray hair to show for it. >> romney hopscotched between the swing states of new hampshire, iowa, colorado and ohio. >> the question of this election comes down to this, you want four more years like the last four years or do you want real change? >> romney is also focusing on wisconsin, one toss-up state where obama is said to have a lead. and he is running more tv ads in pennsylvania, mich
under way across the u.s. as americans decide who will lead the country for the next four years. after vigorous campaigning right to the last minute and aggressive advertising that made it the most expensive campaign of all time, president barack obama and his challenger mitt romney both into the election day confident of victory. >> but most election polls say the race for the white house is too close to call, meaning the result will be decided in a small number of so-called swing states by florida, ohio, virginia, and new hampshire, which was the first to vote on the stroke of midnight. >> voting began early in this part of new hampshire. the first ballot such traditionally cast here at midnight, and after the first 10 were tallied, it was a drop -- draw. >> for president -- this has never happened before -- we have a tie. five votes each. >> of voting in dick's bill has never been a gauge for the rest of the nation, but this year, polls show the race is a dead heat -- voting in dixville has never been engaged for the rest of the nation. >> after all the months of campaigning, after
recent biennial survey which looks at american public opinion on the u.s.'s role in the post-9/11 world will be the launch pad for today's conversation. all on this panel and i were in government on 9/11 which, by the way, occurred on a crisp and clear tuesday, which will be tomorrow's weather so i understand, and the day of the week that is tomorrow. we were in different roles. all of us regardless of our party position or party, struggle to find the right strategies to keep our country safe. looking back on it, we did some things right and some things wrong. i lament especially that we never debated and put in place a comprehensive legal framework for the post-9/11 world. mike hayden, who you'll meet in a moment, was prepared to help with this by fully briefing the intelligence committees at more than one point. but at one point was called back by the white house and not able to brief us on a crucial part of the strategy. there was a headline of an op-ed in yesterday's new york times. and it was "how resilient is post-9/11 america?" the piece made the point, which i think is critical
. a combination of tax increases exami and spending cuts and could push the u.s. economy into a recession as all eyes are on how that develops. here in japan, too, the nikkei was down 3.75% last week, so we saw that play into the markets as well. the gdp figure is coming at 0.9% for the july-to-september period. we'll see how that is translating into the opening levels. let's go to the opening levels for the nikkei and topix for many monday, november 12th. both indices are down by half a percent there. the nikkei closed out last week at a four-week low as the yen gained against the dollar and euro. the japanese currency rose. really investors shifting money into yen-based assets and the higher yen weighing on export issues. this is at a time when many japanese corporations are releasing poor earnings over the last couple of weeks. that's all most of that based on the strong yen. don't forget europe, we can't ignore that sector and economy either. the renewed concerns about greece despite pushing through an austerity plan. that's a big focus as well, how that plays into stock markets. >> how are
an additional burden. >>> u.s. defense secretary leon panetta is urging congress to strike a deal before the end of the year. that's to avoid a fiscal cliff which may result in a significant reduction in defense spending. the fiscal cliff is a term used to illustrate drastic fiscal tightening if congress fails to reach an agreement by year's end. such a situation is feared to trigger a plunge in the economy. panetta warned that defense spending will be subject to drastic cuts if lawmakers failed to reach a consensus. >> the worst thing that could happen from my perspective is that they just kick the can down the road. all that would wind up doing is continuing to present a shadow over the defense department and for that matter, the rest of government. >> the defense department is already planning to reduce its budget by about $500 billion over the coming ten years. panetta has voiced concern that further cuts could undermine barack obama's new defense strategy that lays more emphasis on the asia pacific region. >>> japanese officials are scratching their heads about how to deal with sluggish tra
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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